Oklahoma Land for Sale

- 1-25 of 9,565 Listings

RE/MAX of Green Country
$960,000 - 
320 Acres  - Vinita, OK
Sherman Shanklin, ALC, RLI, CRS, RENESherman Shanklin, ALC, RLI, CRS, RENE
RE/MAX of Green Country RE/MAX of Green Country
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Oklahoma Land Information

Internal data from LandWatch lists $4 billion of Oklahoma land listings and rural property for sale. With tens of thousands of properties and rural land for sale in the state, LandWatch features a total of 503,017 acres of land for sale in the state. The average price of Oklahoma farms, ranches and other land parcels for sale is $373,523. Oklahoma's agricultural economy is largely driven by livestock products including cattle (over half), hogs, and broiler chickens. U.S. News & World Report ranks Oklahoma as one of the country's top ten states for its cost of living. In terms of landmass, Oklahoma is the country's 20th-largest state, covering 69,903 square miles (45 million acres). Wildlife species to be found on land for sale in Oklahoma include whitetail deer, turkey, ducks, hog, and dove. Anglers can enjoy casting for bass, catfish, and walleye.

Oklahoma covers a diverse landscape that incorporates 12 distinct ecoregions. Hunters and outdoor sports people can enjoy some 1.6 million acres of wildlife management areas throughout the state, while anglers get their pick of 35 major lakes covering over a half-million acres.
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More Information About Oklahoma

Oklahoma is located in the South Central United States, and borders Colorado and Kansas to the north, Missouri and Arkansas to the east, Texas to the south, and New Mexico to the west. It is the 20th largest state and the 28th most populated state. Its name comes from words in the Choctaw language meaning "red people." Its nickname is "The Sooner State," in reference to the non-native settlers who staked their claims on the best pieces of land before the official opening date. The largest city and state capital is Oklahoma City, with other large cities being Tulsa, Norman, Broken Arrow, Lawton, Edmond, and Enid. Nearly two-thirds of the state's population live in the metropolitan statistical areas of Oklahoma City and Tulsa. Cimarron County in the panhandle is the only county in the U.S. to touch four other states, which are New Mexico, Texas, Colorado and Kansas.

Oklahoma is a major producer of natural gas, oil, and agricultural products. It ranks third in the nation for production of natural gas, is the 27th most agriculturally productive state, and ranks fifth in the country in wheat production. It is the fifth largest producer of crude oil and has the second largest number of oil rigs in the country. Oklahoma is fifth in cattle production and fifth in the production of wheat. Poultry and swine are also major agricultural products. Other important industries include aviation, energy, transportation equipment, food processing, electronics, and telecommunications. The aerospace sector is also among Oklahoma's largest industries, with Tulsa being home to the largest airline maintenance base in the world. It is one of the top 10 states in aerospace engine manufacturing. It is the top manufacturer of tires in North America. Other manufacturing industries include biotechnology, meat processing, oil and gas equipment manufacturing, and air conditioner manufacturing. Four Fortune 500 companies are headquartered in the state, including one of the largest truck stop and convenience store chains in the country. There are also distribution centers of several large retailers located in the state. Oklahoma has more than 50 public, private, and independent colleges and universities, including four tribal colleges. The largest public institutions in the state are Oklahoma State University, University of Oklahoma, the University of Central Oklahoma, and Northeastern State University, all with several satellite campuses throughout the state. Oklahoma City University, University of Tulsa, and the two state universities rank among the best undergraduate business programs in the country.

Most of Oklahoma lies in the Great Plains, Cross Timbers, and U.S. Interior Highlands, and the landscape contains mountain ranges, prairie, mesas, and forests. Oklahoma is one of four states to harbor more than 10 distinct ecological regions, with 11 in its borders, which is more per square mile than any other state. There are four primary mountain ranges: the Ouachita Mountains, the Arbuckle Mountains, the Wichita Mountains, and the Ozark Mountains. A portion of the Flint Hills stretches into the north central area of the state. The northwestern corner of the state has a rolling flat landscape with intermittent canyons and mesa ranges. The southwestern region is partial plains dotted with small island mountain ranges. The central region of the state is covered by transitional prairie and oak savannahs. The Ozark and Ouachita Mountains stretch west to east over the eastern third of the state. There are more than 500 named creeks and rivers in Oklahoma, and it holds the nation's highest number of artificial reservoirs, with more than 200 lakes created by dams. Oklahoma has more than 70 state and national protected parks and wildlife areas. Six percent of the state's 10 million acres of forest is public land, including part of the Ouachita National Forest, the oldest and largest national forest in the southern part of the country. Chickasaw National Recreation Area is the largest of the federally-protected areas, with 9,899 acres. Other notable parks include Wichita Mountains National Wildlife Refuge, Okmulgee State Park, including beautiful Okmulgee Lake, Robbers Cave State Park, with scenic bluffs and the hilly woodlands of the San Bois Mountains, Beavers Bend State Park, featuring a resort lodge, cabins, RV camping along the shores of Broken Bow Lake and the Mountain Fork River, Lake Texoma State Park, an 89,000-acre reservoir that is one of the most popular lake destinations in the country, and Alabaster Caverns State Park, featuring a three quarter-mile cavern formed of alabaster, a rare form of gypsum, the largest natural gypsum cave open to the public. There are also hundreds of sites throughout the state on the National Register of Historic Places, as well as museums and other places of interest featuring pioneer and Native American history.